‘Mermaids’: A New Year’s Countdown

happynewyearblogathon8What better way to end the year than by participating in a blogathon for the first time? Movie Movie Blog Blog is hosting a blogathon surrounding movies that involve New Years in some way. I was tempted to use a rewatch of Carol (2015) or even High School Musical (2006) for my post. But instead, I decided to go with Mermaids (1990) which I have been meaning to watch for quite a while. 

Mermaids is based on a novel which follows the life of an eccentric mother (Cher) and her two daughters (Winona Ryder and Christina Ricci) who are dragged along on her many spontaneous cross-country moves. This movie explores life changes, mother-daughter relationships, and coming-of-age.

So, in the spirit of New Year’s Eve, let’s countdown a few of my favourite parts of the film!

  1. Parents don’t always know what they’re doing. Cher’s character mentions briefly that, as a mother, she’s trying her best, but she doesn’t always know what she’s doing. I loved this moment of honesty and it serves as a reminder that we can’t expect flawlessness from our parents.
  1. The sudden twist in events. All I can say is that this movie went from zero to one-hundred in less than a heartbeat. But the change of tone at the beginning of the final act was necessary to give the film a greater emotional depth.
  1. Eye rolls. I have only included this because Winona Ryder’s character rolls her eyes just like I do, and I feel that that should be acknowledged.
  1. Character growth. A family who is used to running – literally and figuratively – away from their issues, comes to realise the importance of talking things out. It was great to see the change in both the mother and her daughter and how it strengthened their familial bond.
  1. Cher’s cheekbones. Yes, they get their very own number in the countdown because it’s what they deserve.
  1. The soundtrack. From “Big Girls Don’t Cry” by the Four Seasons to “It’s My Party” by Lesley Gore, the songs in Mermaids had me singing-along. In fact, it was Cher’s “The Shoop Shoop Song (It’s in His Kiss)” that got me interested in watching this movie in the first place!
  1. “Charlotte, we’re Jewish.” One of the first lines spoken by Cher’s character, Rachel, when she finds her daughter praying in front of a statue of Mother Mary.5acd957b1566616973dab4df564d2454.jpg
  1. Costumes. I think it is safe to say that my outfit aesthetic for this week will be majorly influenced by the costumes worn by Cher in this film. (Catch me donning a turquoise mermaid tail and a blonde wig this New Year’s Eve.)
  1. Winona Ryder. When does she ever fail to impress? Ryder’s performance manages to add quirkiness and humour to a fifteen-year-old character who is dealing with the absence of a father, the values of the Catholic religion, as well as an impulsive mother.
  1. The final scene: First Beetlejuice and now this, Winona Ryder seems to give her audience the most entertaining dance sequences. In Mermaids, the movie ends with a feel-good, table-setting, sing-along to Jimmy Soul’s “If You Want to Be Happy.

And that concludes my entry in the Happy New Year Blogathon. Thank you to Movie Movie Blog Blog for hosting this fun event! I can’t wait to read about the New Year’s movies other bloggers have watched this month.

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6 Comments

  1. Nice post! I must confess that I have seen this movie and did not like it (Cher’s character eventually grated on my nerves), but you put forth some convincing arguments for the movie, and I agree that the final scene is fun. Thank you for your contribution to the blogathon!

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